As Local Profile previously reported last month, Frisco Mayor Jeff Cheney briefly talked about the 2026 World Cup and its economic benefits. Now, it’s FC Dallas’ turn.

“The economic impact will stagger your minds,” said Mayor Cheney at the time. “People will drive 300 miles — hotels 300 miles away will be booked out during the World Cup. So, what is this going to mean for Frisco to have fans to come, be based here, [us] host things at the National Soccer Hall of Fame, to be able to host teams and other kinds of things? It’s going to be a major, major win for the city of Frisco.”

Earlier this week, Local Profile spoke with Gina Miller, FC Dallas’ vice president of media and communications, about what the team — and Toyota Stadium — hoped to get from the 2026 World Cup. 

Games will not be played at the Frisco stadium, Miller explained, adding that Arlington’s AT&T Stadium was always central to the bidding process, because of its seat and luxury suite capacity. But that doesn’t mean World Cup players won’t grace the field at Toyota Stadium. 

“Frisco is going to benefit,” says Miller. “We see ourselves as being a training ground or base camp for a national team. Whether the team is playing in the US or going to Canada or Mexico, we are perfectly situated.” 

But it’s not just Frisco’s geographic location, close proximity to DFW International Airport or the excellent nearby hotels. The grounds-keeping staff are knowledgeable and experienced in dealing with playing and training conditions for world-class teams. “We have held big matches here with some of the best soccer teams in the world,” says Miller. “We know what they need and expect.”

According to Miller, the goal is to host at least six games at AT&T Stadium, including an opening game, a final or a semi-final. “We are aiming big here,” she adds. 

But FC Dallas’ home Toyota Stadium on World Cup Way will still be an important part of the soccer extravaganza. Says Miller, “You cannot tell the story of the 2026 World Cup without Frisco.”

Brian Ashcraft

A native of North Texas, Brian Ashcraft previously lived in Japan for over two decades. He has authored six books, including the award-winning Japanese Whisky and The Japanese Sake Bible. Prior to joining...